Studies in Learning, Evaluation, Innovation and Development > Vol. 2, No. 1 (2005)

CAMPUS - Computer-Based Training in Medicine as part of a Problem-oriented Educational Strategy

Sebastian Garde, Health Informatics Research Group, Faculty of Informatics and Communication, Cen
Matthias Bauch, Laboratory for Computer-Based Training in Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Ge
Martin Haag, Laboratory for Computer-Based Training in Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Ge
Jörn Heid, Laboratory for Computer-Based Training in Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Ge
Sören Huwendiek, University Children's Hospital Heidelberg, University of Heidelberg, Germany
Franz Ruderich, University Medical Centre, Erlangen, Germany
Reiner Singer, SAP AG, Walldorf, Germany
Franz Josef Leven, Laboratory for Computer-Based Training in Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Ge

Abstract

Computer-based training (CBT) systems can efficiently support modern teaching and learning environments. CAMPUS is one example for such a system – supporting medical education using real medical cases in a constructivist learning approach. CAMPUS is now available in English and is used for teaching and learning in medicine, but also supports teaching and learning in nursing. In this paper, we demonstrate on the basis of CAMPUS that long-established and current learning theories and design principles (e.g. Bloom's Taxonomy and practice fields) are (i) relevant to CBT and (ii) are feasible to implement using computer-based training and adequate learning environments. Not all design principles can be fulfilled by the system alone, the integration of the system in adequate teaching and learning environments therefore is essential. Adequately integrated, CBT programs become valuable means to build or support practice fields for learners that build domain knowledge and problem-solving skills. Learning theories and their design principles can support in designing these systems as well as in assessing their value

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